Hradebni 9 Prague 1, Prague, CZ, 110 00

  • Phone: (420) 296 398100
  • Fax: (420) 296 398150
4.8 out of 5 (6 reviews)
83% of guests recommend this hotel
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  • Arts & Museums

    »Galerie Gema

    Many well-established artists show their work here, including some with international reputations such as Jiri Kolar, Olbram Zoubek, Eva Kmentova. This was one of the earliest private galleries to spring up following the collapse of Communism in 1989. See their website for a list of up-coming events.

    Haštalská 27
    Prague, 110 00

    »Postal Museum - Czech Post (Potovní muzeum - Česká pota)

    This place is a boon for the philatelist. The emphasis here is on Czech and Czechoslovak stamps. However, stamps and other postal materials are also on sale. Temporary exhibitions are held upstairs. These may be of contemporary art or have a postal theme.

    Nové mlýny 2
    Prague, 110 00

    »Galerie Czech Baroque

    This new gallery is run by a private foundation whose mission is the preservation of baroque sculpture. Exhibitions of Czech contemporary art in the same room add an unusual counterpoint. The gallery was one of the many visual-arts projects that marked Prague's place as a European City of Culture in 2000.

    Rámová 6
    Prague, 110 00

    »National Museum of Agriculture (Národní zemědělské muzeum)

    The permanent exhibition, at this venue, concentrates on the development of agriculture and food production in the Czech lands over the past two centuries. It uses models and mockups of farms, workshops and breweries as well as various kinds of farming and production machinery. What's more, step in on the first Wednesday of the month and you are allowed free admission.

    Kostelní 44
    Prague, 170 00

    »Stone Bell House (Dům U kamenného zvonu)

    The Prague City Gallery uses this extraordinary Gothic palace as its prime site for temporary exhibitions. Past shows have featured Czech surrealism, Art brut, Joan Miro, German landscapes and a biennial of young Central European artists.

    Staroměstské náměstí 13
    Prague, 110 00

    »House of the Black Madonna (Dům u Černé Matky Boží)

    There may not be any Picasso at the House of the Black Madonna, but you will find a small assortment of paintings, furniture and even coffee sets made during the height of the Cubist craze in the early twentieth century. One of the better-known artists in this school was Josef Capek, brother of the writer Karel Capek. Czech architects also adopted Cubism - the building itself, by Josef Gocar, is a good example of this. Notice the triangular projections above the windows which represent a way of expressing different angles of vision simultaneously.

    Celetná 34
    Prague, 110 00

    »Choco-Story Muzeum čokolády

    It has been every child's fantasy to live in a world made up of chocolates and the fantasy, partially comes true here at the Choco-Story Muzeum čokolády. The sweet bundle of joy that has delighted generations and will delight generations to come, needs glorification and Muzeum čokolády does just that. Here you will be able to find answers to all your questions related to chocolate; from how is it sourced to different kinds of chocolate. Feel free to be intrigued and pick the brains of your guides, they will be more than happy to enlighten you. From delicious candies to shapes of chocolate that should be hidden away from kids, this place has it all.

    Celetná 557/10
    Prague, 110 00

    »Jewish Ceremonial Hall (Obřadní síň)

    The Jewish Burial Society, or Chevrah Kaddishah, (founded in 1564), used this neo-Romanesque building adjoining the Old Jewish Cemetery during the early twentieth century. Today it houses an exhibition by the Jewish Museum on medicine, death and burial. The great rabbi and philosopher Judah Loew helped found the society and it once counted many leading lights of the community among its members. The displays include some of the oldest tombstones from the Old Cemetery, china and silver used at society banquets, objects used in the ritual cleansing and dressing of the dead and a series of eighteenth-century paintings showing the society's many functions. Check the website for varying dates.

    U starého hřbitova 39/1
    Prague, 110 00

    »Klausen Synagogue (Klausova synagoga)

    This section of the Jewish Museum focuses on customs and traditions. The central role of ritual in Jewish life is emphasized by a rich array of objectsperhaps the finest collection of craft-work in the entire museum. Downstairs, are masses of silver and tapestry from the many, now defunct Czech synagogues. Upstairs, you will see objects used in the home, from a marvelous painted circumcision screen dating back to 1764 and an upholstered circumcision chair (1805), with one seat for the child's godfather and one for the prophet Elijahto smaller items such as skillfully worked silver spice boxes in the shape of elephants, ships and fish. This is perhaps the most fun and interesting section of the museum, which gives one the feeling that Judaism still thrives in Bohemia and Moravia. The visiting days vary, for specific timings check the website or call ahead.

    U starého hřbitova 243/3a
    Prague, 110 00

    »Jaroslav Jezek Memorial - Blue Room (Památník Jaroslava Ježka - Modrý pokoj)

    This place is for real enthusiasts of the Czech avant-garde movement of the twenties and thirties. Jaroslav Jezek (1906-42) was a major writer of political satires and anti-fascist dramas in the years leading up to the Nazi dismemberment and subsequent invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1938-39. Jezek asked the architect and designer Frantisek Zelenka to make over a small room in his flat in functionalist style. It is known as the "Blue Room" for its dominant color, which Jezek found soothing to his extremely weak eyes. Jezek's piano and record collection are also on display.

    Kaprova 10
    Prague, 110 00

    »Sex Machines Museum

    The museum which was inaugurated in 2002, received a lot of flak from the citizens of Prague which only resulted in acceleration of its popularity. Sex Machines Museum displays sex toys, some of which are as old as the 16th Century. This is a very interesting museum having permanent exhibits of sex machines from across the world and some of their famous exhibits are the Greek prostitutes' shoes, Asian Magic Box and throne chairs with holes. The museum also throws light on the topic of sex and how it has evolved in times to come. A small theater is housed inside the museum where visitors can watch some of the oldest erotic movies.

    Melantrichova 476/18
    Prague, 110 00

    »Museum of Communism (Muzeum Komunismu)

    At the Museum of Communism, visitors will be completely immersed into the history of the Soviet Union's notorious system. Videos, a historical schoolroom, an interrogation room, real artifacts and life-like factories will teach you about the daily life, politics, economics, education and censorship policies of the Soviets. The Museum of Communism is the first museum in Prague to focus on a totalitarian regime since the Velvet Revolution.

    Na Příkopě 10
    Prague, 110 00
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